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Modeling the impact of road safety communication campaigns and training programs on driving behaviour

Modeling the impact of road safety communication campaigns and training programs on driving behaviour

Dr. Ioannis Adamos
Adjunct Lecturer  
Department of Civil Engineering
University of Thessaly

Wednesday 12/12/2018, time 14:00pm
Room A2, Department of Civil Engineering

Abstract: There is growing evidence that driver fatigue is a major road safety problem, causing crashes, which frequently involve fatalities and severe injuries. Professional drivers are among the road users indicated by literature as of high risk to get involved in a fatigue-related crash.
The goal of this presentation is to introduce an integrated framework, which facilitates: a) the design of road safety interventions, i.e. communication campaigns and training programs, b) the evaluation of their effectiveness, c) the assessment of their impact on driving behaviour and d) the development of behavioural models for predicting drivers’ intentions and behaviour towards safety. The framework was validated on a Greek road safety communication campaign targeting all types of drivers, and a training program focusing on 162 professional drivers of a leading company in building materials in Greece, both addressing an important safety issue, driver fatigue. Implementing a coherent evaluation plan, self-reported data were collected through a face-to-face questionnaire survey, before, during and after the campaign realization, and before and after the training program.
In addition, in the case of the training program, the analysis of self-reported behaviour was supplemented with data obtained by trip recorders (Geographical Positioning System – GPS devices), in order to investigate potential threats, deficiencies and bias of the previous measurements.
Findings revealed that drivers’ objective behavioural changes do not directly reflect to actual driving compliance with safety standards. This was expected as road safety interventions need long maturing period, before their impact is visible. On the other hand, self-reported measurements seem to be more sensitive to behavioural changes. The advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are significant and should be spherically assessed by researchers before implementing them to evaluate road safety interventions.